Monthly Archives: December 1969

1969.12.03: EOP studies minority hiring patterns here (UCLA Daily Bruin)

Bruin 1969.12.03

UCLA Daily Bruin, December 3, 1969

EOP studies minority hiring patterns here
By Laurel Gilbert
DB Staff Reporter

“There is a terrible state of affairs here,” said Leon Letwin, chairman of the Equal Opportunity Program (EOP) here. “We have a white middle class faculty.”

Adopted in the early part of this year by the Academic Senate, the program is designed to increase the number of minority faculty members on campus and to help those who have been forced to interrupt their academic pursuits.

According to Letwin, out of the 1,500 permanent faculty positions, no more than 30 are held by blacks and no more than four by Chicanos. Letwin said he is concerned with making sure that discrimination is not practiced by the University’s construction contracts. EOP, however, has no authority to act in this aspect of hiring.

A more detailed report of how many minority people are being hired by the University will be published when the results of a recent survey sent to all departments is evaluated.

Letwin said it is difficult to come by this information and that he doesn’t know of any other central, detailed report on the subject of minority hiring.

Recently, a letter was sent to EOP by a woman who challenged the anti-nepotism rule of the University. The rules states that in any one department no more than one member of a family may hold a faculty position.

A meeting of EOP has been called for the end of December to discuss her complaint and decide if the issue she has brought up is relevant to the program. Letwin said that if the topic of nepotism is not included in the concern of EOP, he will refer the letter to the proper channel of the Senate for discussion and evaluation.

Discussing getting employment at the university from which a professors receives his degree, an EOP resolution stated, “We recognize that, in general, it is to the advantage of both the individual and the institution that his initial position not be at the degree-granting institution. But there should, of course, be no bar to employment of our own Ph.D’s when they would bring special and unusual qualities to our faculty.”

Recommendations passed by the Senate involving the expanded use of exchange and visiting professorships and the use of “adjunct professorships” of part-time appointments include the use of positions such as as “faculty associate” and “resource consultant.” These capacities are intended for those people who lack traditional academic qualifications but whose insights and experiences would be important contributions to the university.

The creation of special at-large lectureships is suggested to bring to the university minority group members “whose contributions do not fall conveniently within the purview of any one department.”

“It is implicit in our endorsement of these concepts and proposals that there is to be no slackening in our quest for a faculty of the very highest quality.”